Natasha Bluth

npb239@nyu.edu
Articles by Natasha Bluth

Aleksey Burago humanizes Chekhov and his impact on the Moscow Art Theater

The most important quality of Chekhov is his sense of humor.


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Benjamin Nathans revisits the drama behind the Soviet dissident movement

We have the basic plot of the story, but we don’t know the drama behind the plot.


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James Andrews on how the Moscow metro tells the story of socialism

There were no fortresses, which the Bolsheviks could not overcome.


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Ada Dialla links Vereshchagin’s art to the rise of humanitarianism in 19th-century Russia

Contributing to a “humanitarian narrative,” Vereshchagin’s work helped craft a bond between those who suffer and those who empathize with that suffering.


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Elidor Mëhilli explores Albanian filmmaking across the 1960s Sino-Soviet split

Albeit brief, Albania was for a short while held up by China as a model for socialism.


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Samuel Casper studies letters to Mikoyan to understand rehabilitation after the Great Terror

Once you’re stigmatized, castigated, reviled for social identity, how do you crawl your way back up?


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Brandon Schechter looks at the Great Patriotic War Through Everyday Objects

The Soviet state reduced the soldier’s biography to the parameters that the army was interested in.


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Ilya Budraitskis on what the 1917 revolution means to contemporary Russia

The way we can discuss revolutions is a political choice.


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Diana Greene introduces her project on 19th-century Russian women’s novels

Why are there no canonical 19th-century Russian women novelists?


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Sergei Guriev’s data analysis looks at the post-Soviet transition

The “transition happiness gap” is finally closed after 25 years.


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Lucan Way argues that revolutionary origins led to Soviet durability

Revolutionary regimes have been among the most durable forms of authoritarianism in the modern era.


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Catriona Kelly approaches “period zapoya” through cinema

On May 13, 2016, the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia and the Tisch School of the Arts welcomed Catriona Kelly for the last colloquium of the Spring 2016 semester, entitled “Period zapoya: Alcohol and Cinema during the Brezhnev Era.” Kelly, who is a Professor of Russian at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of the British Academy, was introduced by Eliot Borenstein, Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University. The former president of Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES) and a prolific writer, Kelly spoke briefly about her ongoing project – a book on the Soviet cine underground, a history of film in Leningrad during the post-Stalin era.


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Panel on Russian-Ukrainian conflict urges constructive dialogue and a global perspective

On May 4, 2016, the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia and the NYU Russian Club held a panel discussion entitled “Beyond Political Games,” dedicated to the Russian-Ukrainian conflict from the historic and cultural point of view. Panelists included Yanni Kotsonis, Director of the Jordan Center, Lucan Way, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, and Peter Zalmayev, Director of the Eurasia Democracy Initiative. The panel was introduced by Rossen Djagalov, Assistant Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at NYU. “In my experience, [this is a topic] that doesn’t really encourage meaningful dialogue for the most part, which is precisely why it’s important,” Djagalov said.


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Slavic literary scholar Michael Holquist negotiates the many “Bakhtins”

On May 2, 2016, the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia welcomed Slavic literary scholar Michael Holquist for a lecture entitled “On a Footnote in Bakhtin.” Holquist, Professor Emeritus of Comparative and Slavic Literature at Yale and a Senior Fellow at Columbia University, was introduced by Ilya Kliger, Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at NYU. “You are all to a greater or smaller extent familiar with Professor Holquist’s incredibly broad ranging work, scholarly, pedagogical and – on behalf of a profession which I hope he will permit me to designate with its frequently forgotten, but proper name – philology,” Kliger said.


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Sergey Sokolov traces the history of republicanism in Russia’s political thought

On April 29, 2016, the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia welcomed Sergey Sokolov for a lecture on “The Emergence of Republicanism in Russia (18th – early 19th c.): from Historical Writings and Literature to Politics.” Sokolov, an Associate Professor at Ural Federal University, was introduced by Ilya Kliger, Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at NYU.


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Evgeny Dobrenko examines the “Cold War” through socialist realist ideology

On April 15, 2016, the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia welcomed Evgeny Dobrenko for a lecture entitled “Soviet Cold War Imagination.” Dobrenko, head of the department of Russian and Slavonic Studies at the University of Sheffield and an April Fellow at the Jordan Center, was introduced by Rossen Djagalov, Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at NYU. His presentation focused on the Stalinist years of the Cold War, as a unique period charting the transformation of the Soviet Union from outcast to superpower in the postwar bipolar world.


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Anindita Banerjee speaks on Aelita, Queen of Mars in Radiant Futures keynote speech

On April 8, 2016, the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia hosted a conference entitled “Radiant Futures: Russian Fantasy and Science Fiction.” After the first panel, NYU Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies Eliot Borenstein introduced keynote speaker Anindita Banerjee. “If we think of our conference and our field in terms of science fiction, then she is Queen of Mars, our Aelita,” Borenstein said. Banerjee, a professor of comparative literature at Cornell University, centered her talk on Aelita, Queen of Mars, a 1924 Soviet silent film directed by Yakov Protazanov based on Alexei Tolstoy’s eponymous novel.


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Yanni Kotsonis shares the value of babushka stories at NESEEES

On April 2, 2016, the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia hosted the 37th Annual Meeting of the North East Slavic, East European and Eurasian Conference (NESEEES, a regional conference of ASEEES). Panel discussions were held throughout the day, with scholars at the junior and senior level, as well as graduate and undergraduate students, to present their work. After being introduced by the Executive Director of NESEEES Susan Smith-Peter, NESEEES President and Jordan Center Director Yanni Kotsonis provided the keynote address, entitled “Babushka and the Sewing Machine, and Other Instructive Fails during My Travels in Russia.”


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Alfred J. Rieber approaches Soviet history through Stalin and the nationality question

On March 28, 2016, the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia and the NYU Department of History welcomed Alfred J. Rieber from Central European University for a lecture on his recent book, “Stalin and the Struggle for Supremacy in Eurasia.” The event was introduced by Jordan Center Director Yanni Kotsonis and was followed with comments by Stephen Kotkin from Princeton University.


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Molly Brunson discusses perspectival space in Gogol’s Dead Souls

On February 26, 2016, the NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia welcomed Molly Brunson from Yale University for a lecture on “Gogol Country: Rural Russia in Perspective.” After being introduced by Anne Lounsbery, Russian and Slavic Studies Department Chair at NYU, Brunson spoke about her work on a new project, titled “Russian Points of View: The Theory and Practice of Perspective in Russia, 1820-1840.” In her talk the speaker opened up productive ways to look at Gogol’s work, resisting fixation on dichotomies in order to center attention on the writer’s use of perspectival devices.


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