#quitseelangs



If you say the word SEELANGS to a Slavist, they will most likely respond by rolling their eyes.

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Formalism and the Future (Part II)



It is unlikely that the category of “art” will ever fully disappear even as the boundary between “art” and “life” grows increasingly muddled.

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Formalism and the Future (Part I)



In the field of Russian literary studies, there has been a recent move towards reviving turn of the century Russian literary theoretical approaches – specifically that of Yuri Tynianov’s formalist predecessor Alexander Veselovsky, whose “historical poetics” approach is currently experiencing something of a renaissance.

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On Cumulative Ideology



This past June — a moment since blotted out by geopolitical horrors large and small — Vladimir Putin sat down with NBC’s Megyn Kelly for an interview subsequently lambasted as boring, “stubbornly uninformative theater.” It’s true that neither party said anything unexpected, instead treating viewers to another episode of “Dogged Journalist Confronts Icy, Obfuscating Politician.” Yet the conversation’s very lack of narrative drive offers insight into the heart of Putin’s messaging strategy — and into the fundamentally cumulative nature of contemporary political ideology.

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The Leviathan and the Gutter: Gefter.ru interviews NYU’s Mikhail Iampolski (Part II)



It’s all very sad, I think. The capacity for thought has already disappeared, and now dignity is gradually being snuffed out, but I don’t see any solutions. People still depend on these vestiges of government. And the government is acting like a depraved medieval lord rather than a modern, institutionalized structure. When libraries are forced to pull books from their shelves — for example, Russian classics published by the Soros Foundation — what can it mean?

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Exhibit Review: “Russian Revolution: A Contested Legacy (1917-2017)”


This fall, the International Print Center New York commemorates the centennial of the Russian Revolution with the exhibit “Russian Revolution: A Contested Legacy” (1917-2017). Curator Masha Chlenova combines historical, early-Soviet, and print media with contemporary works by Yevgeniy Fiks and Anton Ginzburg.

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Hacking, Heckling, and Conspiracy: Interview with Julia Ioffe



What you need is something we don’t have yet in the case of the election, and might never have, which is somebody from the inside saying, “Here’s how we did it.” And once they do, it’s going to be surprising. It won’t be the way that we predicted. Because truth is stranger than fiction.

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Rasputin’s Penis: The Documentary (Part I)



All we could confirm was this: in the late 1990s, a man named Michael Augustine purchased a storage locker that turned out to be belong to Marie Rasputin — Rasputin’s daughter — who had moved to California and died there in 1977. He discovered what appeared to be a giant penis preserved in a jar among Marie’s personal effects.

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Tracing Communism’s Reach, 100 Years After the Russian Revolution: An Interview with Joshua Tucker



Was Fukuyama right? Did communism die with the Soviet Union? Your answer may depend, in part, on your definition of what it means for an ideology to be “living.” But NYU politics professor Joshua Tucker’s new book, Communism’s Shadow (co-written with Grigore Pop-Eleches), which analyzes the attitudes of individuals living in post-communist countries, suggests that communist thought continues to have a real impact today.

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The Class of 2021 Looks Back



I remember the truck taking away the last books to the recycling center because we had a strict green policy and I remember the last prof who the cops had to take out when she attacked them with a dictionary which was a kind of book and the other one who was placed in a care home babbling a weird language that Siri couldn’t understand because of his accent. I do remember some American words like “ambiguous” but Siri didn’t know what that was and kept answering “ambitious” and he had dandruff and it haunts me to this day.

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Canada, Hockey, and the Cold War



What had begun as score-settling with upstart pretenders to Canada’s pre-eminence acquired its epic qualities because the victory came over the Soviet Union, the hegemon of the Communist bloc. 

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