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January 2019

Russian Elites and Western Sanctions: A Political Economy Under Strain?

January 29 @ 12:30 pm - 1:50 pm

Western financial and legal systems provide essential protection for Russian elite assets and reputation. Sanctions threaten continued access to these services. If sanctions intensify, they may disrupt a set of bargains between the Russian state, oligarchs and Western interests that have helped stabilise Putin’s political economy. What choices face Russia’s elites, what power do they have to protect their interests, and what are the implications for Russia’s future and Western policy?   Dr. Nigel Gould-Davies is an Associate Fellow of…

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February 2019

Thugocracy: A Way to Think about Trump and Russia

February 1 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia, 19 University Place
New York, NY 10003 United States
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U.S. Special Counsel Robert Mueller's indictments and other prosecutorial filings point to unprecedented and unusual interactions between Trump campaign personnel and Russian political and oligarchic circles. These appear to suggest broad Russian elite participation in the project to make Trump president. Yet there is a long history of transnational, organized political and criminal enterprise surrounding the Trump "project." A wider, socio-political analysis of Trump's networks can provide nuance to the standard narratives about "Trump-Russia." Taking advantage of the voluminous legal…

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Book Talk with Will Smiley-From Slaves to Prisoners of War: The Ottoman Empire, Russia, and International Law

February 5 @ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Tuesday, February 5th 5:00pm - 7:00pm Richard Ettinghausen Library, 255 Sullivan St. Commentators: Prof. Yanni Kotsonis and Dr. Karin Loevy The Ottoman-Russian wars of the eighteenth century reshaped the map of Eurasia and the Middle East, but they also birthed a novel concept--the prisoner of war. For centuries, hundreds of thousands of captives, civilians and soldiers alike, crossed the legal and social boundaries of these empires, destined for either ransom or enslavement. But in the eighteenth century, the Ottoman state…

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Taboo in Russia: banned or suppressed issues-Lecture and Q&A

February 6 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Any political regime should be judged not by the official propaganda narrative, but by the silences, the subjects that are omitted in the public discourse. In contemporary Russia, vast layers of issues and problems are suppressed or outright banned. As a result, the very issue of strategy for development and the future of the country is not discussed at all, and neither the government, nor the opposition are capable of formulating the tasks and main challenges of the moment. Dmitry…

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Informational Autocrats

February 13 @ 12:30 pm - 1:50 pm

Occassional Series| Wednesday, February 13th| 12:30pm - 1:50pm

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To Analyze or Not: The Documentary Prose of Varlam Shalamov and Lydia Ginzburg

February 15 @ 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
NYU Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia, 19 University Place, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10003 United States
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Colloquium Series | Friday, October 26th, 2018 | 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

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A Loyal Middle Class: How Post-Communist Autocrats Use the State Sector to Secure Support

February 20 @ 12:30 pm - 1:50 pm
Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia, 19 University Place
New York, NY 10003 United States
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Occasional Series| February 20th| 12:30pm - 1:50pm

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Sincerity out, authenticity in: poetry on the quest for trust in the times of post-truth

February 25 @ 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Back then in the first half of 1990s new generation of Russian poets, — or its considerable part — found itself facing the challenge of inventing a new way to speak straightforwardly: readily available poetics either weren’t quite fit for the job or themselves were part of the problem to be resolved. Poetry optics, which has emerged at the time in the capacity of the solution, was the “new sincerity”. The new generation of poets entering the scene since the…

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March 2019

Is Madness Revolutionary?: Pavel Ivanovich Karpov’s Tvorchestvo dushevnobol’nikh

March 1 @ 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Four years after the publication of Hans Prinzhorn's landmark Artistry of the Mentally Ill (1922), Russian psychiatrist P.I. Karpov published a book of (almost) the same title, studying psychotic art in Russia and Soviet Union. Completely overlooked in scholarship on outsider art, Karpov's book offers an insight into attempts to understand art of the mentally ill in Soviet Union that ran parallel to Prinzhorn’s groundbreaking work. Karpov based his observations on a collection of outsider art he accumulated over the…

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April 2019

Between the Hammer and the Anvil: Buriat-Mongols, the Soviet Union and Imperial Japan

April 5 @ 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

The Soviet Union and Imperial Japan have been viewed as being ideologically on opposite sides: the former was communist and internationalist, and the latter fascist, anticommunist, and pan-Asianist. But how different were the two regimes in controlling the frontiers of their respective imperial spaces on the Asian continent? The Soviet Union and Imperial Japan converged in the Mongolian territories (Buriatia, Outer and Inner Mongolia), which were geopolitically highly important and served as buffer zones between Soviet Russia and Japanese-occupied Republican…

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