All the Russias' Blog

A space for news and opinion, sponsored by The Jordan Center

Formalism and the Future (Part II)


It is unlikely that the category of “art” will ever fully disappear even as the boundary between “art” and “life” grows increasingly muddled.

Continue reading...

Formalism and the Future (Part I)


In the field of Russian literary studies, there has been a recent move towards reviving turn of the century Russian literary theoretical approaches – specifically that of Yuri Tynianov’s formalist predecessor Alexander Veselovsky, whose “historical poetics” approach is currently experiencing something of a renaissance.

Continue reading...

On Cumulative Ideology


This past June — a moment since blotted out by geopolitical horrors large and small — Vladimir Putin sat down with NBC’s Megyn Kelly for an interview subsequently lambasted as boring, “stubbornly uninformative theater.” It’s true that neither party said anything unexpected, instead treating viewers to another episode of “Dogged Journalist Confronts Icy, Obfuscating Politician.” Yet the conversation’s very lack of narrative drive offers insight into the heart of Putin’s messaging strategy — and into the fundamentally cumulative nature of contemporary political ideology.

Continue reading...

The Leviathan and the Gutter: Gefter.ru interviews NYU’s Mikhail Iampolski (Part II)


It’s all very sad, I think. The capacity for thought has already disappeared, and now dignity is gradually being snuffed out, but I don’t see any solutions. People still depend on these vestiges of government. And the government is acting like a depraved medieval lord rather than a modern, institutionalized structure. When libraries are forced to pull books from their shelves — for example, Russian classics published by the Soros Foundation — what can it mean?

Continue reading...

Exhibit Review: “Russian Revolution: A Contested Legacy (1917-2017)”


This fall, the International Print Center New York commemorates the centennial of the Russian Revolution with the exhibit “Russian Revolution: A Contested Legacy” (1917-2017). Curator Masha Chlenova combines historical, early-Soviet, and print media with contemporary works by Yevgeniy Fiks and Anton Ginzburg.

Continue reading...

Read more of the "All the Russias" Blog