Brianna Philpot

brianna.philpot@nyu.edu
Articles by Brianna Philpot

New-Generation Warfare and the Fringe Right: How Russian Interference Impacts Right-Wing Extremism in the US, Part III

The white supremacist fascination with Putin’s Russia is not alarming only because it represents a distasteful admiration for anti-democratic and authoritarian values but also because it presents a direct threat to US national security. White supremacists are not merely racists who otherwise favor the US and its institutions; they actively seek to undermine American society and governance, and they will almost certainly welcome help from Russia, who seeks the same.

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New-Generation Warfare and the Fringe Right: How Russian Interference Impacts Right-Wing Extremism in the US, Part II

It is difficult to say whether anyone, Russia included, could purposely engineer another QAnon movement. However, QAnon is a masterclass in manipulating an audience by playing to its expectations and fears. Russia will almost certainly take QAnon as a model for evoking an extreme and compelling response among right-wing targets, and microtargeting will make it easier than ever before.

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New-Generation Warfare and the Fringe Right: How Russian Interference Impacts Right-Wing Extremism in the US, Part I

Russian interference campaigns do not discriminate. They target the left as well as the right. But with right-wing violence the largest terrorist threat facing the US today, the potential impact of Russian interference on far-right targets is a pressing issue for US policymakers.

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Why the US Should Normalize Relations with Syria

US challenges in the Middle East are complex and years in the making. They will require equally complex and protracted solutions, for which success is by no means assured. But allowing Russia to continue to take advantage of a rapprochement with Syria would be a mistake from the perspective of US foreign policy. 

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Will American Liquefied Natural Gas Change the Russian Sanctions Game?

When Russia annexed Crimea in 2014, the United States reacted with its first round of sanctions against the country, with the Obama administration levying additional sanctions in December of 2016 after the American Intelligence Community announced that Russia had interfered in the American presidential election. We may never know what effect American sanctions have had on the situation in Ukraine, but one thing is clear: they have not deterred Russia from continuing to target American elections. Why? As this post will argue, the structure of the Russian economy is partly to blame.

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How NATO Destabilizes Europe

As NATO has expanded since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, Moscow’s sphere of influence has shrunk. The result is an environment that contributes to Russia’s sense that it is insecure and “surrounded by enemies.” NATO and US actions in the wake of the Euromaidan revolution in Ukraine have confirmed Russian fears, increasing the likelihood of open conflict. Meanwhile, the rise of authoritarianism, especially in Poland, Hungary, and Turkey, has created fractions within the alliance that Russia can and will exploit. Against this background, NATO’s behavior appears to incite Russian retaliation even as its structure prevents the alliance from addressing the threat potential Russian aggression poses to NATO member states.

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