The Strength and Flexibility of Maria Kolesnikova



While the possibility for political change has seemed nearly unimaginable under Lukashenko’s long tenure, the penetration of global consumer culture over the past decade has nonetheless helped to shape a different type of citizen-subject, even in the absence of substantial economic reform. This emerging subject strives to achieve a set of orientations that scholars associate with neoliberal economic regimes: constant investment in the self, flexibility, self-reliance, and perpetual positivity.

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A Brief History of an Indo-Soviet Cultural Affair



The collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s led to the end of an era of robust cultural exchange between Russia and India, but lingering artifacts of this longstanding cultural affair still exist within literature, music, and theater, awaiting excavation by historians, scholars of literature, and eager internationalists.

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Bigger Nets Mean More Goals: Russian Cultural Diplomacy and the KHL



Despite not being an official government entity, or perhaps precisely because it is not associated with the Kremlin and thus is not seen as a propaganda tool, the Kontinental Hockey League thus serves as an ideal vehicle for Russian cultural diplomacy, projecting a favorable image of successful, Russia-based hockey clubs while also creating people-to-people ties that foster an interest in Russia across several countries.

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Conversation in the Kitchen: Sasha Dugdale’s Voiced Translation of Maria Stepanova



Some may argue that there is a conflict of interest in translating a friend, but Sasha Dugdale’s deft translations of Maria Stepanova, with whom she is close, suggest that friendship can be a source for a powerful, mutual, and reflexive embodying of the written word, particularly between two women enjoy defecting from the word as much as they do living in it.

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New-Generation Warfare and the Fringe Right: How Russian Interference Impacts Right-Wing Extremism in the US, Part III



The white supremacist fascination with Putin’s Russia is not alarming only because it represents a distasteful admiration for anti-democratic and authoritarian values but also because it presents a direct threat to US national security. White supremacists are not merely racists who otherwise favor the US and its institutions; they actively seek to undermine American society and governance, and they will almost certainly welcome help from Russia, who seeks the same.

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New-Generation Warfare and the Fringe Right: How Russian Interference Impacts Right-Wing Extremism in the US, Part II



It is difficult to say whether anyone, Russia included, could purposely engineer another QAnon movement. However, QAnon is a masterclass in manipulating an audience by playing to its expectations and fears. Russia will almost certainly take QAnon as a model for evoking an extreme and compelling response among right-wing targets, and microtargeting will make it easier than ever before.

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In Putin’s Vision of Ukraine’s Past, A Warning About Russia’s Future



On 12 July 2021, Russian President Vladimir Putin published a historical essay titled “On the Historical Unity of Russians and Ukrainians.” He frames the essay as a follow-up to a comment he made on “Direct Line,” the annual call-in show where Putin answers questions from constituents. On this occasion, Putin characterized Russians and Ukrainians as “a single people” [Rus. voobshche odin narod]. Expanding on his original comment, the Russian president offers a version of historical events suggesting that today’s ruptures between Russians and Ukrainians have no basis in reality, but are instead rooted in artificial divisions constructed and exploited by both foreign powers and the Soviet Union.

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