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May 2021

Russian TV Commercials: The Short Course, Lecture One – Soviet Commercials: Keeping Up with the Dzhonses

May 21 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Join us for a series of lectures by NYU Professor Eliot Borenstein about the joys and sorrows of Russian and Soviet television advertising. These informal lectures are geared towards students, scholars, and anyone who might be interested in the topic. And yes, we take requests. The series will run weekly on Fridays, starting on May 21st. Lecture One - Soviet Commercials: Keeping Up with the Dzhonses A look at the early years of Soviet television commercials. What were these commercials…

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Paying for Sex in the Late Russian Empire (with Siobhan Hearne and Discussant Colleen Lucey)

May 19 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Join us for another 19v seminar! In this talk, Siobhán Hearne will give an overview of her new book Policing Prostitution: Regulating the Lower Classes in Late Imperial Russia, before presenting her chapter that focuses specifically on men who paid for sex, a group that are often silent in histories of prostitution. The demand side of the commercial sex industry was supposed to be faceless. Unlike women registered as prostitutes on the Empire's system of state regulation, clients’ names and…

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NYC Russia Public Policy Series: New Tensions in Russia-Ukraine Relations: The Drivers and Politics Surrounding the 2021 Russian Troop Build-up

May 10 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

The New York-Russia Public Policy Series is co-hosted by the Harriman Institute at Columbia University and the New York University Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia. After weeks of growing regional tensions as Russia amassed more than 100,000 troops next to Ukraine’s borders, on April 22, 2021, Russian defense officials ordered troops back to their bases, with Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu commenting that the forces had “demonstrated their ability to provide a credible defense for the country.” What were the drivers behind this large Russian military…

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Ottoman “Frontiers” in Russia and the Indian Ocean

May 7 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

This panel will present new ways of understanding the borders and boundaries of the Ottoman Empire, specifically as they relate to Eurasia and the Indian Ocean. Dilyara Agisheva focuses on how the annexation of Crimea by the Russian Empire in 1783 generated new ruptures and entanglements with respect to the Crimean 'ulamā', the Ottoman state, and the Islamic community of the former Crimean khanate; Ömer Faruk Topal situates Eastern Arabia within the 19th-century Ottoman imperial context and demonstrates how the…

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‘A Brilliant Anomaly’: Nadezhda Durova/Aleksandr Aleksandrov’s Queer Autofiction (with Margarita Vaysman and Discussant Connor Doak)

May 5 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Join us for another 19v seminar! In Russia, the nineteenth-century writer Nadezhda Durova (1783-1866) is well-known as a cross-dressing ‘Cavalry Maiden’, a young noble woman who in 1806 left her home in provincial Russia and served, under the name Aleksandrov, as a cavalry officer during the Napoleonic wars. Outside of Russia, there has been in the last decade a sustained interest in Nadezhda Durova/Aleksandr Aleksandrov as one of the very few canonical genderqueer figures in Russian literary history who have…

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Negative Revenue Shocks and Economic Development in Russian Regions (with Delgerjargal Uvsh)

May 3 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

In this talk, Jordan Center Postdoctoral Fellow Delgerjargal Uvsh will explore how Russia’s oil- and gas-producing regions dealt with two instances of declines in their natural resource revenues and how their strategies affected economic activities in their territories. Based on analyses of quantitative and qualitative data, she argues that when faced with a long-lasting decline in their resource revenues, Russia’s oil and gas producing regions aimed to compensate for the lost revenues by expanding their tax base. This strategy led…

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April 2021

Women, Feminists, and Other Poets: A Series of Readings and Conversations

April 29 @ 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

For the third installment of "Women, Feminists, and Other Poets: A Series of Readings and Conversations" the Jordan Center will host poets Dina Gatina, Polina Barskova, and Vlazhyna Mort alongside professor and translator Ainsley Morse. This April, the Jordan Center will host 6 contemporary Russian poets for a series of readings and conversations. With a view to the recent anthology F-Letter: New Russian Feminist Poetry (isolarii, 2020), this series probes the recent history of women writing poetry in Russian. Whether explicitly feminist or…

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The Sanatorium Movement, the Union of Towns and the Envisioning of Post-War Russia, 1914-1917 (with Yoshiro Ikeda)

April 26 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

During the First World War, Russia’s government and public organization sent sick and wounded soldiers to various health resorts across the empire. The ideal aim of this project was to heal the combatants with the help of the bountiful nature of the homeland. In this enterprise, the treatment of tuberculous soldiers in the sanatorium occupied a special place. It had its own history in the form of the people’s sanatorium movement of the pre-war decades, which sought to offer the…

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Women, Feminists, and Other Poets: A Series of Readings and Conversations

April 22 @ 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

For the second installment of "Women, Feminists, and Other Poets: A Series of Readings and Conversations," the Jordan Center will host Oksana Vasyakina, Elena Fanailova, and Stephanie Sandler. This April, the Jordan Center will host 6 contemporary Russian poets for a series of readings and conversations. With a view to the recent anthology F-Letter: New Russian Feminist Poetry (isolarii, 2020), this series probes the recent history of women writing poetry in Russian. Whether explicitly feminist or otherwise, women have been prominent, if not…

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Sentimental Realism, or Literature in Russia (with Hilde Hoogenboom and Discussant John Randolph)

April 21 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Join us for another 19v seminar! The study of literature in Russia challenges notions about the markets, readers, and writers of Russian literature, which was quite well integrated with European markets. According to my data, foreign novels accounted for around 90% of the market through the middle of the century. European sentimental novels, translations, and women writers circulated internationally, and were central to the fabric of nineteenth-century literary life throughout Europe and Russia. George Sand may be the most studied…

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