State-Sponsored Hijacking and International Responses: The Political Challenge of the RyanAir Incident



The New York-Russia Public Policy Series is co-hosted by the Harriman Institute at Columbia University and the New York University Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia.

The forced landing of a Ryanair flight by Belarusian authorities and coerced detention of dissent journalist Roman Protasevich has spotlighted the practice of transnational repression: the targeting of political exiles and opposition figures abroad by authoritarians and their security services. President Lukashenko’s brash act has been referred to as a “state-sponsored” hijack and has prompted the EU to terminate flights by Belarsus’s national carrier, avoid the use of Belarusian airspace, and consider adding more sectoral and individual sanctions. At the same time, Russian Present Vladimir Putin has strongly supported Lukashenko and Western condemnation appears to be further driving Minsk into the political embrace of Moscow. Our expert panel of professionals from journalism, academia, and the human rights community will discuss why Protasevich was targeted, why these acts of transnational repression are growing more common, and what implications the Ryanair incident will have for US and EU relations with Belarus and Moscow.

This event is supported by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Watch the event recording on YouTube

SPEAKERS

Hanna Liubakova, freelance journalist and researcher; Nonresident Fellow at the Atlantic Council

Tatyana Margolin, Regional Director of the Open Society Foundations Eurasia Program

Nate Schenkkan, Director of Research Strategy at Freedom House

Yuval Weber, Bren Chair of Russian Military and Political Strategy at the Brute Krulak Center for Innovation and Future Warfare, Marine Corps University; Research Assistant Professor at Texas A&M’s Bush School of Government and Public Service

Moderated by:

Alexander Cooley, Director of the Harriman Institute, Columbia University

Joshua Tucker, Director of the Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia, New York University

BIOGRAPHES

Hanna Liubakova is a freelance journalist and researcher from Belarus and a nonresident fellow at the Atlantic Council. She also works as a journalism trainer and mentor. She started her career at the only independent Belarusian TV channel where she worked as a correspondent and TV presenter. Liubakova has reported from various countries and regions, including Belgium, UK, Poland, France, and Chechnya. She was a recipient of the Václav Havel Journalism Fellowship at Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty in Czechia, as well as a World Press Institute Fellowship in the United States. She received a degree in Art History from The Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland in 2010 and a Master of Art with distinction in International Journalism from Brunel University in London in 2017. Liubakova was awarded the Peter Caws Prize for best postgraduate dissertation.

Tatyana Margolin is regional director for the Open Society Eurasia Program. Margolin was previously a division director for the Eurasia Program, leading the program’s work on responding to the reactionary backlash and closing civic space in the Eurasia region. Prior to joining the Eurasia Program, Margolin was a program officer for the Open Society Public Health Program, where she developed innovative approaches to integration of legal aid and harm reduction initiatives, and published and spoke widely on issues of access to justice for the most marginalized groups. An attorney by training, Margolin was previously a foreign law clerk at the Supreme Court of Israel and a staff attorney at the Women’s Law Project, a nonprofit legal advocacy organization committed to fighting discrimination against women.

Nate Schenkkan is the Director of Research Strategy at Freedom House. He previously served as the Director for Special Research at Freedom House, overseeing Freedom House’s research portfolio outside of its annual reports. He also previously served as the Project Director for Nations in Transit, Freedom House’s annual survey of democratic governance from Central Europe to Eurasia, and as Senior Program Officer for Freedom House’s Eurasia programs, covering Central Asia and Turkey. He was the lead researcher and co-author of two Freedom House special reports, The Struggle for Turkey’s Internet and Democracy in Crisis: Corruption, Media and Power in Turkey. He is the co-author of Freedom House’s special report on transnational repression, Out of Sight, Not Out of Reach. Prior to joining Freedom House in 2012, he worked as a journalist in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. He has been published in Foreign AffairsForeign PolicyThe Washington PostEurasianetWorld Politics Review, and Russian Analytical DigestRead his opinion piece about transnational repression in the Washington Post (Feb. 3, 2021).

Yuval Weber is the Bren Chair of Russian Military and Political Strategy at the Brute Krulak Center for Innovation and Future Warfare at Marine Corps University, and is also a Research Assistant Professor at Texas A&M’s Bush School of Government and Public Service. He has previously served as the Kennan Institute Associate Professor of Russian and Eurasian Studies at Daniel Morgan Graduate School, at Harvard University as a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department on Government, and as an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. Weber has held research positions at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University, at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars, and the Carnegie Moscow Center. He has published on a range of Russian and Eurasian security, political, and economic topics in academic journals and for the popular press in the United States and Russia. He is currently working on two projects, one that develops a tool to measure hierarchy and resilience in international affairs to chart the course and conduct of great power competition, and a second that examines the tension between demands of economic modernization and the security state in Russian political economy. The latter manuscript is scheduled for publication in 2021 (Agenda/Columbia UP).


NYC Russia Public Policy Series: New Tensions in Russia-Ukraine Relations: The Drivers and Politics Surrounding the 2021 Russian Troop Build-up


The New York-Russia Public Policy Series is co-hosted by the Harriman Institute at Columbia University and the New York University Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia.

After weeks of growing regional tensions as Russia amassed more than 100,000 troops next to Ukraine’s borders, on April 22, 2021, Russian defense officials ordered troops back to their bases, with Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu commenting that the forces had “demonstrated their ability to provide a credible defense for the country.” What were the drivers behind this large Russian military build-up, and did they achieve their objectives? Did reactions by EU and US officials play a positive role in encouraging a de-escalation, or should we expect new tensions to arise over the course of the year? How have the Russian and Ukrainian publics reacted to the prospect of a renewed regional conflict?

Please join us as we examine these important questions surrounding the 2021 crisis, with leading security and political researchers from academia, think tanks and the policy world.

Watch the event recording on YouTube

PANELISTS

Timothy Frye, Marshall D. Shulman Professor of Post-Soviet Foreign Policy at Columbia University; Director of the International Center for the Study of Institutions and Development at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow

Michael Kofman, Senior Research Scientist in the Russia Studies Program at CNA; Fellow at the Kennan Institute, Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, DC

Olga Oliker, Program Director for Europe and Central Asia at the International Crisis Group in Brussels; Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies at SAIS Europe

Polina Sinovets, head of the Odessa Center for Nonproliferation (OdCNP) and Associate Professor in the International Relations Department at the Odessa I. I. Mechnikov National University (ONU), Ukraine

Moderated by:

Alexander Cooley, Director of the Harriman Institute, Columbia University

Joshua Tucker, Director of the Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia, New York University

BIOGRAPHIES

Timothy Frye is the Marshall D. Shulman Professor of Post-Soviet Foreign Policy at Columbia University and Director of the International Center for the Study of Institutions and Development at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. He is the author of Brokers and Bureaucrats: Building Markets in Russia, which won the 2001 Hewett Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies; Building States and Markets after Communism: The Perils of Polarized Democracy, which won a Best Book Prize from the APSA Comparative Democratization section in 2010; and Property Rights and Property Wrongs: How Power, Institutions, and Norms Shape Economic Conflict in Russia (2017). His newest book is Weak Strongman: The Limits of Power in Putin’s Russia (Princeton University Press, April 2021).

Michael Kofman serves as a Senior Research Scientist in the Russia Studies Program at CNA and as a Fellow at the Kennan Institute, Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, DC. His research focuses on Russia and the former Soviet Union, specializing in Russian armed forces, military thought, capabilities, and strategy. Previously, he served as a Program Manager and subject matter expert at National Defense University, advising senior military and government officials on issues in Russia and Eurasia. Kofman is also a Senior Editor at War on the Rocks, where he regularly authors articles on strategy, the Russian military, Russian decision-making, and related foreign policy issues. He runs a personal blog on the Russian armed forces. Kofman has published numerous articles on the Russian armed forces, security issues in Russia/Eurasia, and analyses for the US government.

Olga Oliker is Program Director for Europe and Central Asia at the International Crisis Group in Brussels. Oliker’s research interests center on the foreign and security policies of Russia, Ukraine, and the Central Asian and Caucasian successor states to the Soviet Union, domestic politics in these countries, U.S. policy towards the region, and nuclear weapon strategy and arms control. Prior to joining the International Crisis Group, Oliker directed the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and held various research and management roles at the RAND Corporation, including as Director of the Center for Russia and Eurasia. Early in her career, she served at the U.S. Department of Defense. She is an Adjunct Professor of European and Eurasian Studies at SAIS Europe and a member of the Deep Cuts Commission.

Polina Sinovets is the head of the Odessa Center for Nonproliferation (OdCNP) at the Odessa I. I. Mechnikov National University (ONU), Ukraine. She is also Associate Professor in the International Relations Department at ONU. Previously, Sinovets served as senior research associate at Ukraine’s National Institute for Strategic Studies, as well as a fellow at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies and NATO Defense College. She is an expert in nuclear weapons policy and has published articles in the Bulletin of the Atomic ScientistsRussia in Global Politics, NATO Defense College Research Papers, and others.


The Russian Private Sector Today: Challenges and Prospects in a Post-Pandemic World



Join us for another virtual meeting of the New York-Russia Public Policy Seminar. This panel is co-hosted by Columbia University’s Harriman Institute and the New York University Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia.

Many argue that politically independent and economically resilient private sector and economic actors are solutions to various problems in contemporary Russia. However, the Russian private sector has faced a double burden from an authoritarian government and flawed economic system. Restrictions related to the Covid-19 crisis exacerbated the challenges encountered by Russian businesses. This meeting of the NY Russia Public Policy Seminar brings together experts in the Russian private sector to discuss the challenges Russian businesses face due to state policies, economic factors, and the pandemic and to examine potential for future development.

Watch the event recording on YouTube

PANELISTS

Simeon Djankov, Director of Development Economics at the World Bank

Dinissa Duvanova, Associate Professor of International Relations at Lehigh University

Alena Ledeneva, Professor of Politics and Society at University College London

Ivan Nechepurenko, Moscow bureau reporter, The New York Times

Andrei Yakovlev, Director of the Institute for Industrial and Market Studies and the International Center for the Study of Institutions and Development at the Higher School of Economics

Moderated by

Alexander Cooley, Director of the Harriman Institute, Columbia University

Joshua Tucker, Director of the Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia, New York University

BIOGRAPHIES

Simeon Djankov is a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Prior to joining the Institute, Djankov was deputy prime minister and minister of finance of Bulgaria from 2009 to 2013. Prior to his cabinet appointment, Djankov was chief economist of the finance and private sector vice presidency of the World Bank, as well as senior director for development economics. In his 17 years at the Bank, he worked on regional trade agreements in North Africa, enterprise restructuring and privatization in transition economies, corporate governance in East Asia, and regulatory reforms around the world. He is the founder of the World Bank’s Doing Business and Women, Business and the Law projects. He is author of Inside the Euro Crisis: An Eyewitness Account (2014), author of the World Development Report 2002, co-author of Europe’s Growth Challenge (2016) and director of World Development Report 2019. He is also coeditor of The Great Rebirth: Lessons from the Victory of Capitalism over Communism (2014) and Covid-19 in Developing Economies (2020).

Dinissa Duvanova is Associate Professor in the Department of International Relations at Lehigh University. Her research interests include international and comparative political economy, political economy of corruption, political institutions, regulatory politics, technology-enabled forms of political participation, and the politics of Eastern Europe, Russia, and Central Asia. She is the author of Building Business in Post-Communist Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia: Collective Goods, Selective Incentives, and Predatory States (Cambridge University Press, 2013), which won the Ed A. Hewett Book Prize. Her articles have appeared in various publications, including Comparative Politics, the British Journal of Political ScienceWorld Development, and the Journal of Comparative Economics.

Alena Ledeneva is Professor of Politics and Society at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies of University College London in the United Kingdom. She is an internationally renowned expert on informal governance in Russia. Her research interests include corruption, informal economy, economic crime, informal practices in corporate governance, and role of networks and patron-client relationships in Russia and around the globe. Ledeneva’s books Russia’s Economy of Favours: Blat, Networking, and Informal Exchange (Cambridge University Press, 1998), How Russia Really Works: Informal Practices in the 1990s (Cornell University Press, 2006), and Can Russia Modernize? Sistema, Power Networks and Informal Governance (Cambridge University Press, 2013) have become must-read sources in Russian studies and social sciences. Currently, she is the pillar leader of the multi-partner ANTICORRP.eu research project.

Ivan Nechepurenko has been a reporter with the Moscow bureau of The New York Times since 2015, covering politics, economics, sports, and culture in Russia and the former Soviet republics. Before working at The Times, Nechepurenko was a correspondent for The Moscow Times, where he covered Moscow’s Crimea annexation and the Winter Olympics in Sochi. Nechepurenko also wrote for a number of Russian publications, including Slon and GQ. Born and raised in St. Petersburg, Russia, he spent five years in Canada, earning a bachelor’s degree in international relations and French from the University of Calgary. This was followed by a master’s degree in international relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Andrei A. Yakovlev is Director of the Institute for Industrial and Market Studies and the International Center for the Study of Institutions and Development at the Higher School of Economics University, Moscow. He is also Professor in the HSE Faculty of Social Sciences, the School of Politics and Governance, and the Department of Theory and Practice of Public Administration, as well as a member of the HSE Academic Council. His professional interests include industrial policy, corporate management, political economy in a transition period, state-business relations, and public procurement.


Sputnik V and Russia’s New Vaccine Politics: Domestic and Foreign Policy Dimensions



Join us for another virtual meeting of the New York-Russia Public Policy Seminar. This panel is co-hosted by Columbia University’s Harriman Institute and the New York University Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia.

Vladimir Putin’s announcement in August 2020 that Russia had become the first country to grant regulatory approval to a COVID-19 vaccine—Sputnik V—generated much fanfare domestically but was initially met with skepticism among expert global scientific communities. Now, with more published results from trials, we see wider acceptance of the claims of the vaccine’s efficacy and a surging global demand for the vaccine from around the world. Please join this distinguished panel of researchers and commentators as we explore how the vaccine was developed in Russia, the issues surrounding its scientific review, and how the Kremlin is now incorporating “vaccine diplomacy” into its broader foreign policy strategy.

Watch the event recording on YouTube

PANELISTS

Enrico Bucci, Adjunct Professor of Biology; Director of the System Biology program of the Sbarro Health Research Organization, Temple University

Judyth Twigg, Professor of Political Science at Virginia Commonwealth University

Joshua Yaffa, correspondent for The New Yorker based in Moscow

Alexandra Yatsyk, University of Tartu

Moderated by

Alexander Cooley, Director of the Harriman Institute, Columbia University

Joshua Tucker, Director of the Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia, New York University


Navalny and the Kremlin: Politics and Protest in Russia


Navalny

Join us for another virtual meeting of the New York-Russia Public Policy Seminar. This panel is co-hosted by Columbia University’s Harriman Institute and the New York University Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia.

Watch the event recording on YouTube

The arrest of opposition politician Alexei Navalny has generated a political crisis in Russia. Upon his arrest, Navalny’s allies released a video investigation into alleged corruption by President Vladimir Putin and his allies and mobilized supporters for mass demonstrations against the Kremlin in order to force his release. In this special session of the New York-Russia Public Policy Series, we consult with leading journalists, academics and communications scholars to analyze the latest political developments, media coverage, and the evolving role of social media in Russia’s protests and opposition.

PANELISTS

Yana Gorokhovskaia, Research Fellow at the Institute of Modern Russia; former postdoctoral scholar at the Harriman Institute

Pjotr Sauer, Journalist at the Moscow Times

Gulnaz Sharafutdinova, Reader in Russian Politics at King’s College London

Aleksandra Urman, Postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Communication and Media Studies, University of Bern; Social Computing Group, University of Zurich

Moderated by

Alexander Cooley, Director of the Harriman Institute, Columbia University

Joshua Tucker, Director of the Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia, New York University

BIOGRAPHIES

Dr. Yana Gorokhovskaia is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Modern Russia and a former postdoctoral scholar at the Harriman Institute. She researches Russian civil society and her work has appeared in Post-Soviet AffairsRussian PoliticsDemocratizationRussian Analytical DigestThe Washington PostThe Guardian, and The Moscow Times among other outlets.

Pjotr Sauer is a reporter covering Russian politics and society at The Moscow Times. A Moscow native with a Dutch background, Pjotr previously worked in political risk consultancy and diplomacy.

Dr. Gulnaz Sharafutdinova, a Reader in Russian Politics at King’s College London, is the author of The Red Mirror: Putin’s Leadership and Russia’s Insecure Identity (2020) which inquires into Putin’s leadership strategy and relies on social identity theory to explain his success, and Political Consequences of Crony Capitalism Inside Russia (University of Notre Dame Press, 2011) which studies the mechanisms through which informal practices of political and economic power have shaped contemporary Russia.

Dr. Aleksandra Urman is a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Communication and Media Studies of the University of Bern and Social Computing Group, University of Zurich. In her research, Aleksandra employs computational methods to examine various aspects of political communication on social media, with a particular focus on polarization, authoritarian regimes and far-right groups. In addition, she is interested in algorithmic biases in web search. Examples of her work include research on far-right communities on Telegram, comparative analysis of political polarization on Twittersocial media-based polarization in Russia, and the distribution of information related to COVID-19 in web search results.


Belarus: Looking Forward and Looking Eastward



Featuring:
Aliaksandr Herasimenka, postdoctoral researcher at the Computational Propaganda Project, University of Oxford
Olga Onuch, Associate Professor in Politics at the University of Manchester
Katsiaryna Shmatsina, Rethink.CEE fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the U.S.
Gerard Toal, Professor of Government & International Affairs, Virginia Tech

Drawing on current and ongoing research, our distinguished panelists will discuss what the several months long movement may mean for the political future of Belarus, Russia, and other countries in the region.

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US-Russia Relations After the US Elections: What Can We Expect?



Featuring:

Nicu Popescu, Director of the Wider Europe Programme at the European Council on Foreign Relations
Samuel Greene, Director of the Russia Institute at King’s College London
Maria Snegovaya, Visiting Scholar at George Washington University and Postdoctoral Scholar at the Virginia Tech PPE Program
Andrey Kortunov, Director General of the Russian International Affairs Council
Viktoriya Zhuravleva, Head of the Center for North American Studies at the Primakov National Research Institute of World Economy and International Relations (IMEMO)

In the wake of the 2020 US presidential election, please join us for a discussion involving academic and policy perspectives from the US, Russia, and Europe on the future of the bilateral relationship.

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NYC Russia Public Policy Series: Is it Time to Rethink Our Russia Policy?



Featuring:

Evelyn N. Farkas, President, Farkas Global Strategies; former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia
Rose Gottemoeller, Payne Distinguished Lecturer at the Center for International Security and Cooperation, Freeman Spogli Institute, Stanford University; former Deputy Secretary General of NATO
Thomas Graham, Distinguished Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations; Senior Advisor, Kissinger Associates
David J. Kramer, Senior Fellow in the Vaclav Havel Program for Human Rights and Diplomacy, Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs, Florida International University

In this webinar, a distinguished group of academics and former diplomats will debate the current state of US-Russia relations and offer their recommendations for dealing with the Russian government.

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Russian Electoral Interference: Present, Past, and Future



Featuring:

Renée DiResta, Technical Research Manager at the Stanford Internet Observatory.
Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Elizabeth Ware Packard Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania, Director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center
David Shimer, Author of Rigged: America, Russia, and One Hundred Years of Covert Electoral Interference, PhD Candidate at Oxford University

In the aftermath of the 2016 U.S. Presidential election, one of the most enduring stories has been the scale with which Russia exploited weaknesses in the digital information environment to interfere with foreign elections, both domestically and abroad.

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Russian Civil Society in the Time of COVID-19



Featuring:

Sarah Lindemann-Komorova, Scholar and Community Development Activist based in Novosibirsk
Andrey Semenov, Associate Research Scholar at the MacMillan Center at Yale University and Senior Researcher at the Center for Comparative History and Politics
Valerie Sperling, Professor of Political Science at Clark University
Elena Topoleva-Soldunova, Director of the Agency for Social Information, Moscow
Denis Volkov, Deputy Director of the Levada Center, Moscow

Our distinguished panelists will discuss what civil society efforts look like in Russia in the time of COVID-19, how challenges that existed before the pandemic have manifested and been exacerbated, and what the future is for Russian civil society post-COVID.

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Russia’s New Tools of Influence in Africa



Featuring:

Roman Badanin, editor-in-chief of the investigative media outlet Proekt
Shelby Grossman, Research Scholar at the Stanford Internet Observatory
Kimberly Marten, Professor & Chair of Political Science at Barnard College, Columbia University
Khadeja Ramali, independent social data analyst and researcher

Over recent years, Russia has played an increasingly active role in influencing the domestic politics of African countries, including Central African Republic, Madagascar and Libya. Russia’s influence activities have grown in their intensity and range, from mounting online social media campaigns, to soliciting economic contracts and even conducting security operations. This distinguished panel of scholars and journalists will share their experiences and insights about Russia’s new toolkit of influence in Africa.

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NYC Russia Public Policy Series: Russia in the Time of COVID-19



Featuring:

Svetlana Borodina, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Rice University
Evan Gershkovich, Reporter, Moscow Times
Gulnaz Sharafutdinova, Reader, Russia Institute, King’s College London
Regina Smyth, Professor of Political Science, University of Indiana, Bloomington
Pjotr Sauer, Reporter, Moscow Times

The COVID-19 pandemic has swept across the world with alarming speed, but impact and reactions have varied tremendously across countries. Our panel will assess the impact COVID-19 has had on Russian society, including vulnerable populations, as well as Russian politics.

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Impeachment – From the Ukrainian Perspective



Join us for the second meeting of the 2019-2020 New York Russia Public Policy Seminar, a forum co-hosted by the Harriman Institute and New York University’s Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia! As the United States enters the next phase of the impeachment process, join our panel of experts as they consider what this means for Ukraine, Ukraine’s relations with Russia, and Russia and Ukraine’s relations with the U.S. moving forward.

PANELISTS

Oxana Shevel 
Associate Professor of Political Science at Tufts University

Olga Onuch
Senior Lecturer in Politics at the University of Manchester

Jordan Gans-Morse
Associate Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University

Keith Darden
Associate Professor in the School of International Service at American University

Moderated by
Alexander Cooley, Director of the Harriman Institute, Columbia University
Joshua Tucker, Director of the New York University Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia

 

This event is supported by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. It is part of Columbia’s Russian Studies & Policy event series.


Thinking About a Future Russia Policy: Presidential Politics, Challenges and Issues



Featuring:

Matt Duss, Foreign Policy Advisor to the Bernie Sanders 2020 Presidential Campaign
Carmel Martin, National Policy Director for the Beto O’Rourke 2020 Presidential Campaign
Celeste Wallander, Advisor on foreign policy for the Pete Buttigieg 2020 Presidential Campaign
Peter Clement, Senior Fellow at the Harriman Institute

Join our distinguished panelists as they examine how U.S. foreign policy towards Russia is likely to be approached by a future Democratic administration.

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NYC Russia Public Policy Series: What do we know about Russia’s 2016 Twitter operation during the US Presidential election campaign?



Featuring:

Cody Buntain, Postdoctoral Researcher at NYU’s Social Media and Political Participation (SMaPP) Lab
Kate Starbird, Assistant Professor, Department of Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE), University of Washington
Patrick Warren, Associate Professor of Economics, Clemson University
Darren Linvill, Associate Professor of Communication, Clemson University
Leon Yin, Research Scientist at NYU’s Social Media and Political Participation (SMaPP) Lab, Research Affiliate at Data & Society’s Media Manipulation Initiative

One of the most important – and enduring – stories to come out of the US 2016 Presidential election campaign was the potential role played by Russia’s “Internet Research Agency” in (potentially) attempting to influence political behavior surrounding the election though the use of digital (dis)information campaigns. On October 17, 2018, Twitter released a collection of over 10 million tweets that it reported were produced by IRA controlled accounts. Our distinguished panelists will present their findings after examining these tweets over the past three months.

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Remaking the social contract? Pension reform and protest in Russia



Featuring:
Kristy Ironside, Assistant Professor in History and Classical Studies at McGill University.
Katerina Tertytchnaya, Lecturer in Comparative Politics in the Department of Political Science at University College London.
Andrei Kolesnikov, Senior Fellow and Chair of the Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.

Please join our distinguished speakers for a panel discussion examining the Kremlin’s recent attempts at reforming the pension system in Russia. 

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The New U.S.-Russian Cold War: Who Is To Blame?



Featuring:

Michael McFaul, Professor of Political Science, Director and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Former U.S. Ambassador to the Russian Federation
Stephen F. Cohen, Professor Emeritus  of Russian Studies and Politics at New York University and Princeton University

U.S.-Russia relations are at their worst since the Soviet era. How did relations between the Untied States and Russia deteriorate to this point and who is to blame?

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Putin’s Last Term?



Featuring:

Henry Hale, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University, Co-Director of the Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia (PONARS Eurasia) 
Yoshiko M. Herrera, Professor of Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Director of UW-Madison Partnership with Nazarbayev University in Kazakhstan
Kimberly Marten, Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Political Science at Barnard College, Director of the Program on U.S.-Russia Relations at Columbia’s Harriman Institute
Graeme Robertson, Professor of Political Science, UNC Chapel Hill

Will Putin actually become a “lame duck” in the conventional sense of term-limited presidents? If so, when?  If not, why? What does this hold for policy – both foreign and domestic – in the coming years? And what does it mean for Russian politics in Putin’s “last term”? If Putin really is going to be stepping aside, then what comes next?

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Russia Hosts the World Cup: Sports and Politics in 2018



Featuring:

Jane Buchanan, Associate Director, Europe and Central Asia Division, Human Rights Watch
Natalie Koch, Associate Professor, O’Hanley Faculty Scholar, Department of Geography, Syracuse University Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
Gabriele Marcotti, Senior Writer at ESPN, Columnist at The Times of London

Our panel, consisting of leading academics, activists and sports journalists will consider the relationship between global sporting events, their world governing bodies and local political agendas, and will identify the trends, themes and tensions that will drive international media coverage of the tournament.

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