All the Russias' Blog

A space for news and opinion, sponsored by The Jordan Center

Play Based on Venedikt Erofeev’s “Moskva-Petushki” Debuts at the East Village Playhouse

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Like Erofeev’s Venya, our own contemporaries seem to suffer from strong disillusionment with authority — an unsurprising outcome in the face of the degradation of discourse, institutions, and stable employment. Corrupt, populist politicians and a corporatized intellectual and artistic elite offer us nothing but mediocrity and moral cowardice. Faced with this void, many people turn to dangerous substitutes, as evidenced by the opioid crisis and the re-emergence of right-wing authoritarian movements in the States and abroad.

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Rodion Raskolnikov, Your Tweet Archive is Ready

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Two years ago, on May 1, 2016, the Twitter account @RodionTweets sent its first tweet. Since then @RodionTweets has livetweeted the events of Dostoevsky’s novel Crime and Punishment, broken into 140-character-or-less snippets, from its hero Raskolnikov’s perspective. The bulk of the novel’s events take place over the course of three intense weeks in the summer, and the bulk of Rodion Raskolnikov’s tweets similarly appeared in July 2016, but the account has continued to tweet the book’s epilogues, which spread over the course of nearly two years. Finally, on April 24, 2018, Raskolnikov’s new life began and the Twitter account went silent.

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Putin wants a shining legacy. He has to solve 3 big problems first.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin has just started his new term in office and is mulling how to secure his legacy. In his fourth and likely last term, he will be working on establishing himself as the leader who returned Russia to international grandeur, stabilized the economy and increased the urban standard of living. But while Putin’s assertive foreign policy has been popular at home, it has also embroiled Russia in complex predicaments that may undo that popularity.

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May Day: A History

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The first of May has been celebrated around the world for centuries. Known as “May Day,” the holiday originated in revelries anticipating the coming of spring in the Northern Hemisphere — and with it, a sense of physical and spiritual renewal. Over the years, this festive rite of spring evolved into a celebration synonymous with workers’ rights, socialism, and the Soviet Union. But what does May Day mean today?

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Putin’s Last Term?

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Surprising no one, Vladimir Putin secured his fourth and possibly final presidential term in an election last March. A panel of scholars discussed what the next six years of Putin could mean for Russia and the world.

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